Getting rid of seborrheic keratosis

Seborrheic Keratosis is an outgrowth occurring on the skins of people who are in most cases aged over forty years. The growths are however not cancerous but are painful, itchy and more of being a cosmetic problem than being a medical one. It is basically associated with accumulation of keratin. After accumulation of the keratin, some wart-like growth develops on the skin. It has been found out that who have less melanin are more susceptible to this condition.

Getting rid of seborrheic kreatosis is not very easy, it requires a lot of tolerance and self-initiative but can be done without problems for anyone. It has been established that the best way of getting rid of this condition is by avoiding those factors that may lead to the infection. There are several ways of getting rid of this condition if you have got it.

Best methods for getting rid of seborrheic keratosis:

The surgical removal of seborrheic keratosis. This condition can be gotten rid by several methods. The treatment method depends on the severity of the condition. In the event that the skin condition is mild, it may be necessary to undergo surgery so as to get rid of the growth. The mild occurrences can be gotten rid of by use of some creams and gels specifically designed for that job. Now, if the condition is severe, you may then require undergoing some surgery.

Cryosurgery method. This is happens to be a very simple surgical method and involves application of a very cold treatment therapy to the skin condition. This makes the seborrheic keratosis to be frozen. When it’s frozen it can be easily removed from the skin without necessarily leaving any scars.

Curettage method. The method involves using some spoon-shaped instrument to scrap off the growth. The procedure to remove the growth may be painful and therefore may require some anesthetic for the pain. This method could be combined with electrocautery so as to prevent any regrowth.

Hydrogen peroxide treatment method. Hydrogen peroxide is a toxic substance and brings about some acidic effect on the area affected. Its burning effect is usually enough to burn the seborrheic keratosis and have it removed from your skin.

Other methods for getting rid of seborrheic keratosis:

If you know other methods for getting rid of seborrheic keratosis, please share with us!

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  1. Maria says:

    I’m wondering what is going on. Recently, I have been getting a few “age spots” on my arms. I just ddn’t mind as they did not cause any pain and they are not really visible till I noticed a small freckle sized crested ones like crested flat warts. Please guid me how could I treat myself well and remove them.

  2. Nicole says:

    Do you think that there is any method to get rid of seborrheic keratosis naturally? I mean a cream or something?

    • Diana says:

      I don’t know any cream to work for seborrheic keratosis.
      The single way to treat seborrheic keratosis is to remove it and there are a few procedures, but no creams. The creams that you find on ebay or other websites and tell you that will treat your seborrheic keratosis are just fakes for naive people.

    • Sarah says:

      Hello Nicole,
      I’m afraid that I need to give you bad news. The only way of getting rid of seborrheic keratosis is to remove it from your skin. WIth other words you will need to: cut, scrap, freeze or burn the growths.

      Don’t be scaried about the name of the procedures. They are not painful, are pretty simple and don’t involve any risks. Take care!

    • Braniac says:

      I am 27 years old and at the age of 24 years I got around 1000 seborrheic keratosis on my abdomen, breasts, neck and back, but I was on a dermatologist and he burned them all with hydrogen peroxide.

      I had a bit of pain, but it was worth all the pain and all money that I spent. Also, don’t waste your time searching or natural remedies for seborrheic keratosis and don’t lose your time with creams and lotions because won’t work. Removing it by the dermatologist is the only way to get rid of seborrheic keratosis!

  3. Monica Lane says:

    Hello Sarah, I have a question for you: what is from your point of view the best way for getting rid of seborrheic keratosis? And with the best way I mean the method that:
    – don’t involve any pain
    – won’t let me scars
    – won’t cost a fortune :)

    • Sarah says:

      Hello Monica,
      Cryotherapy is that what are you looking for: cheap, won’t hurt and won’t let you scars.

  4. Get rid of seborrheic keratosis says:

    Hello, my name is Johnny, I’m 41 years old and in last 4 years I got a lot of seborrheic keratosis growths on all my body. I’m sick of them and I would like to go on a dermatologist to get them cauterized. What do you think about that?

    Do you know any others good methods for getting rid of seborrheic kratosis? I would like to find out more about those of them that won’t let me scars on the skin, because a lot of them are on the face and I really won’t like to have scars on my face :)

    • Linda Curttis says:

      Hello Johnny,
      Cryotherapy is also a good option for getting rid of seborrheic keratosis. Talk with your dermatologist about this too!

  5. Angela says:

    Hello,

    My mother was to a dermatologist today because of seborrheic keratosis. They are brown, raised patches on the skin, rough and cracked surface, as if a piece of mud that is stick in the skin.

    He have about 30 seborrheic keratoses and the removal of those things from her back would cost us about 250 $. She says that the seborrheic keratosis are itch, so she would like to get rid of them as quck is possible.

    From my point of view 250 $ are a lot of money and is to expensive for a seborrheic keratosis removal. What other alternatives do we have? Anything that is cheapper and effective of course. A home remedy or something that can help her to get rid of seborrheic keratosis at home will be also appreciated.

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This information is provided to supplement the care provided by your dermatologist and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.