Treat Seborrheic Keratosis With Hydrogen Peroxide

Seborrheic keratoses is a skin growth that is not cancerous. The growth is usually common in adults and middle age people. The good news is that the condition is not contagious.  The growth may appear on any part of the skin causing ugly marks. They differ in appearance ranging from individuals but the skin color has been proved to affect the appearance of the growths. In some cases, they may look like moles or cause similar appearance like skin cancer. Yet the most disturbing display of Seborrheic keratoses is the waxy look they put on the victims skin. They affect the skin and make it look like a barnacle sticking to a ship. The condition is serious and ought to be treated with utmost sobriety.

Despite the fact that the growths do not pose any existential threats, they need to be treated. Hydrogen peroxide is quite instrumental in treating this condition. It is a mode of treatment that has stood a test of time and many prefer it because it has zero side effects to the skin. Because of the availability of hydrogen peroxide, the treatment is the most Appropriate for you. Its affordability has also attributed to its effectiveness.

Dermatologists advice that when you go to purchase the hydrogen peroxide, insist on original type. Plus, when you want to use the solution, it is advisable to dilute it and reduce the concentration to 25%. After this, proceed to apply the solution to the affected parts of the skin using a soft piece of cloth. A lot of caution needs to be observed when doing the treatment. For instance, the treated parts should not be left exposed to the sun. Ensure that the area is covered using a duct tape. This is a measure that will deter the acid from evaporating. As such, the hydrogen peroxide is completely absorbed into the skin.

How hydrogen peroxide works?

Hydrogen peroxide works by making the growths caused by seborrheic keratoses disease   to shrink. Once these growths begin to shrink, it takes a few days and they will be completely removed from the skin. The solution also has the ability to make the condition burnt completely. The acidic effect of hydrogen peroxide blocks nutrients from the body. Hydrogen peroxide works by attacking the nutrients and depriving the growths of the supply.

Once the supply of the nutrients has been cut short, the skin condition begins to die naturally. However, for an effective treatment, it is advisable to carry out consistent application. This is very advisable especially for the stubborn growths and spots.This treatment is perfectly fine and does not cause any form of stinging sensation.

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  1. Nick D. says:

    What are the risks of using hydrogen peroxide works for seborrheic keratosis treatment?

    • Jason says:

      I don’t know if there are many risks by using hydrogen peroxide but the only side effect of his that I heard is the skin iritation because the high concentration and the power of the acid.

      As about the treatment with hydrogen peroxide, I can tell you that is very efficient. There are a lot of people that used it and are happy with the results. I don’t need to say that the treatment with hydrogen perioxide is one of the cheapest one :)

    • Diana says:

      There are no risks in treating seborrheic keratosis with hydrogen peroxide if the removal is done by a dermatologist. ;)

      • Tom says:

        Why pay a dermatologist to do something you can do, just as safely, yourself, at home? Plus, is a doctor more likely to use an inexpensive procedure or one that costs more?

        • Sarah says:

          Well Tom, not all doctors are the same.
          I know a lot of doctors who don’t care about the money, they know a single thing: to cure the patient :)

          And as about your question “why to pay a dermatologist?”, well I will give you just one reason. Seborreic keratosis may look similaar with skin cancer. You can’t know for sure if is seborrheic keratosis or skin cancer until you have a biopsy. With other words, if you don’t see a dermatologist you can stay with skin cancer without knowing about it for a long time. Is that a reason good enough? :)

    • Madlene says:

      There are no risks as time as you or your doctor know what is doing. Seborrheic keratosis removal with hydrogen peroxide is the most simple method …

  2. Jannet Priest says:

    I don´t know if the treatment with hydrogen peroxide is really ok and safe. I say that because until now I saw 4 dermatologists and all of them was against of this type of treatment. They gaved me 2 reasons:
    1. are very skecptical about the result of this treatment.
    2. the hydrogen peroxide will destroy the entire area of the skin.

    • Amara says:

      I don’t know what to say, I know people that used succefuly hydrogen peroxide for their seborrheic keratoses treatment.

      The first thing that I have in mind right now is that your dermatologists refused to use hydrogen peroxide because is a very cheap treatment :)

      • Alan Mowle says:

        You are very confusing, you know people who have successfully used H2O2, how about some details. I cannot get any REAL details anywhere, all I read is incomplete, NOBODY speaks about a successful end result or shows a sequence of photographs to a good end result.

        • Amara says:

          I don’t want to be ironic, but next time when I see my neighbor I will ask her to let me to take a photo of her breast to show you pictures and “REAL details” :)

          Hydrogen Peroxide works for seborrheic keratosis. I know that for sure, I saw it with my own eyes. If you want details about seborrheic keratosis removal with hydrogen peroxide, tell me more specifically what details you want and if I have them, I will try to help you.

    • Tom says:

      I guess doctors are skeptical because they’ve never tried it, or official studies or papers haven’t been published which prove or disprove the efficacy of the treatment. I know that it works. As for destroying the entire area of the skin…that is patently FALSE. If one uses petroleum jelly around the lesion being treated, the surrounding skin is unaffected. Even if no P.J. is used, the skin, temporarily, turns a lighter shade, then returns to normal. I have personally experienced this.

  3. […] can remove Seborrheic Keratosis using Hydrogen Peroxide (Burn them with acid. I guess that is the cheapest […]

  4. Ann says:

    I have tried to remove one spot, so far and I found that applying a shield of petroleum jelly around the affected area helps. So far it is working. Anyone know more about this, let me know please.

    • Sarah says:

      I saw A LOT of seborrheic keratosis cases, and I talked with a lot of people that had seborrheic keratosis and have tried all kind of creams, lotions, herbs etc.

      I didn’ heard for anyone to cure seborrheic keratosis with them. I didn’t heard about anything of petroleum jelly that works for seborrheic keratos. I’m a bit sceptic of this, but I would really enjoy to hear that in you case a petroleum jelly will cure your seborrheic keratosis :)

      Please, keep me informed!
      Take care,
      Sarah

      • Tom says:

        Petroleum jelly is used to protect the skin surrounding the keratosis lesion when using food grade 35% hyrogen peroxide, aka, H2O2. Petroleum jelly won’t remove the lesion. It’s the H2O2 that does the job.

    • Tom says:

      Petroleum jelly is a good way to protect the surrounding skin of a SK. I have used that method, myself. As for dermatologists who say H2O2 doesn’t work…of course they’ll say that to get more of our hard earned $$, that insurance won’t reimburse. H2O2 DOES

  5. Valentino says:

    I got my seborrheic keratoses removed with hydrogen peroxide.
    If someone want my opinion, hydrogen peroxide is the best treatment for seborrheic kreatosis! :)

  6. Garnette says:

    My dad’s back was spotted like a leopard before he passed away and I saw a few signs of developing spots on my own back so was looking into treatment. I’ve been using hydrogen peroxide on one spot for about a week and it has shrunk remarkably so I’ll be using it on the rest and any more that develop.

  7. Mike says:

    I have some Sks on my scalp. Does anywhere know if the Hydrogen Peroxide can be used on the scalp with negatively affecting hair follicles? I would have to go bald in the process of getting rid of the Sks.

  8. Really? says:

    Why don’t you let people decide for themselves? :) Nothing is without risk, even with a doctor.

    • Linda Curttis says:

      Well, everyone is free to decide what he thinks that is right for him. We are just trying to give them a pice of advice here :)

      You have right. Even with a doctor there is a risk, but can we compare the risk of doing it with someone who is doing this every day (a doctor) with the risk of self removal? I guess, you alreadty have the answer :)

  9. Ed Stephens says:

    Hydrogen peroxide? Hope it works, if not you may want to try Oil of Oregano with at least 70% Carvacrol.

    I was diagnosed with a Seborrheic keratoses on my back approximately the size of a nickel, which was raised up from the skin level about 1/8″ overall and was told to either live with it or have a traditional treatment of either Cryosurgery or Electrosurgery. I chose to try using Oil of Oregano with at least 70% Carvacrol, the active ingredient for it’s anti-fungal properties. I applied it topically although infrequently and yet it began to soften, the area reddened, became itchy but it also began to break off in small pieces. It stopped growing and once I realized the effectiveness chose to apply it daily and over the period of 4-5 months it all but disappeared. The skin area is now smooth and the only remnant is what appears to be a mole about 1/4 the size of what the Seborrheic keratoses was before I began the treatment. I realize now that it would have gone away earlier had I used the treatment daily from the outset.

  10. Valerie says:

    I had one on my stomach a few years ago. A friend told me to put clear nail polish on it, and I did. It took a couple of months – probably because I couldn’t see it and didn’t tend to it on a regular basis – but now when I look for signs of it, I can’t even be sure where it was. Early this week I found one on my shoulder. This same friend told me that duct tape was an alternative – both methods starve the keratosis for oxygen. Because the nail polish was subject to cracking after a while, I put a small square of clear packing tape over it, and now, not even a week later, the keratosis is barely visible.

    The discoloration is completely gone, and all I can see – if I look carefully – is a vaguely pinkish ring delineating the perimeter of the keratosis. Not sure I need to, but I’ve been changing the tape every couple of days. If I take off the tape and hold it up to the light, most of the tape is clear, but the part over the keratosis is foggy looking. I guess it’s picking up the dying skin? Maybe the process is done when the whole tape comes up clear??? As an aside, I have never used hydrogen peroxide or apple cider vinegar, and so far the process on both keratoses has been painless and scarless.

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This information is provided to supplement the care provided by your dermatologist and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.